Countdown To Heat Death

findingmyrecovery:

I’m still going through all the amazing messages you guys have been sending me. I can honestly say you kept me alive last night. After I posted about what was going on, it got a LOT worse and I was basically blacked out but still screaming my face off somehow. My mom…

You are not alone. You are never alone. 

humorinrecovery:

I’m not the one that asks for help, I’m the one that gives it.. But I’m 100% not at all okay right now and I’m so fucking desperate.

My chronic health issues have reached a point of my pain being so agonizing that even on opiates I’m clawing my skin off in my sleep and waking screaming. I can…

I reblogged this in your previous post, but I feel I should put it here as well.

If you are feeling distressed, there is always someone available on the national suicide hotline. One does not have to be suicidal to use them. I have used them multiple times when I have felt very depressed but not suicidal. There is nothing wrong with using it. The individuals there are trained to help you, and they will listen to you for as long as you need them to listen. You are not wasting their time, you are helping them do what they have volunteered to do.

The number is 1-800-273-8255. 

You can get help. You can get better.

I hate myself so much and I don't know what to do ... I want to tell someone but I don't want to be a bother or for anyone to worry about me... I'm just so lost ...
Anonymous

humorinrecovery:

It doesn’t make you a bother or a burden or a selfish person to ask someone for support and a listening ear

If you are feeling distressed, there is always someone available on the national suicide hotline. One does not have to be suicidal to use them. I have used them multiple times when I have felt very depressed but not suicidal. There is nothing wrong with using it. The individuals there are trained to help you, and they will listen to you for as long as you need them to listen. You are not wasting their time, you are helping them do what they have volunteered to do.

The number is 1-800-273-8255. 

My therapist told me to work on thought correction to help with anxiety. I've gotten better at it, but every time I correct an anxious thought, I get really depressed. What am I supposed to do? I feel helpless.
Anonymous

lets-beat-mental-illness:

Hey there lovely, 

I’m also working on thought correction (seriously I am struggling so much with it) and all I can say is talk to your therapist about it. It might just be that your trying to change the way you think and that can unlock certain emotions but s/he will be able to help or give you some advice. 

I’m so sorry I couldn’t help anymore than that. 

Sending love, Grace xx

You don’t need to feel helpless, because you are not. You are working with a therapist because you have hope you will get better, and because of that hope you are not helpless. You are looking into various solutions and trying them out. You are encountering bumps on the road which happens with everyone when they are in recovery, because you are pursuing recovery. It feels frightening, but that is because your mind is rebelling against the solutions. It wants to go back to what it was used to, and you are fighting against that. That takes a great deal of courage.

You are not helpless. You are very, very strong. 

smiliu:

You are not alone: student stories of mental healthBy Libby Page and Guardian readers, The Guardian
Students share their experiences of mental health issues and reveal a common and worrying problem
When I asked students to share their experiences of mental health at university, I had no idea of the reaction it would receive. Over five days we received over 200 stories. Many entries we weren’t able to include, for legal reasons or because the experiences described were too harrowing to publish.
Originally planned to stay open for two weeks, we decided to close the project early because there wasn’t the capacity to moderate the influx of entries. Each morning we were met with more stories – from students who opened up about their anxieties and struggles.
If you are reading this and are dealing with a mental health issue yourself – you are not alone.
Students shared stories of depression, anxiety, self-harm and suicidal thoughts. Some spoke of diagnosed conditions such as obsessive compulsive disorder and bipolar disorder, and the distructive effect these conditions sometimes have on their education.
When it came to lesser-known issues such as borderline personality disorder, students spoke of a lack of understanding about what they were going through.
Others talked about the embarrassment they felt about asking for help. Some were as yet undiagnosed but clearly struggling: “I stay up all night crying” was a common phrase.
No one tells you that university might be difficult, said students. You were sold on stories from your older friends and the glossy prospectus – there are no footnotes about loneliness and disillusionment.
One anonymous student said: “As a fresher you are constantly reminded that this is supposed to be the ‘time of your life’. When it feels like the worst time of your life you feel both a sense of guilt and a pressure to keep these negative thoughts to yourself.”
Another said: “I spent the first few weeks of uni hiding in my dorm room crying my eyes out. I was homesick and wasn’t sure if I wanted to be there at all.”
Mental health issues can start in childhood, and many students spoke about a history of depression or self-harming that they carried to university. But a new life can add pressures.
"My depression and anxiety started some time before I came to university, but leaving home, being in an extremely taxing social environment and being under large academic pressure all took their toll on me," said one student.
Another said: “Getting tubes or being anywhere I didn’t know felt uncertain. I always had a burning, itching, tormenting anxiety bubbling in my chest. At the time, my boyfriend had no comprehension of mental illness and would regularly tell me panic attacks didn’t exist, that I was stupid and that I had no friends.”
Managing your studies alongside a mental health issue can be a daily struggle. “Panic attacks followed by depression meant things rapidly spiralled out of control,” said one student.
"I found I simply couldn’t think straight and my short term memory became terrible. The best description I could muster was that it felt as though the entire world had been rotated very slightly and nothing was the same anymore."
Another student said: “I’m absolutely terrified of being in social situations in which I don’t know the people I’m speaking to – seminars are a nightmare. I’ve often missed my contact hours because I’ve been up all night crying and stressing and can’t face going in.
"I don’t feel like I can tell my tutors why I’m missing their classes, because I feel like they won’t believe me as I haven’t been officially diagnosed."
Others said the stress of deadlines and feedback from tutors contributed. One student said: “I had a burn-out from the pressure of juggling nine modules. One of the triggers was some negative feedback I recieved in writing from a lecturer which included the word terrible. It was hard to get family support as they live far away.”
Students expressed a general feeling that university support services were helpful – when they could access them. After suffering from a severe anxiety attack, one student took the step to contact their university counselling service.
They said: “I’d put it off for so long, but finally I defined myself as ‘mentally ill’. It did take a few weeks for them to back to me, but nothing can describe the relief I felt when a therapist for the first time said to me, ‘that must be really hard’. Yeah, it was hard! Finally, someone who understood, who didn’t tell me to snap out of it.”
But others are still struggling. “When I started my undergraduate degree I did the responsible thing and informed my supervisor that I had depression,” said one anonymous student, who has since been diagnosed with bipolar disorder.
"He informed me that in his opinion depression was a girls issue and he didn’t know what to do with girls issues and sent me on my way."
Another student said: “My university supported me in my decision to suspend my studies and have helped me get back on track to resume my studies in September, yet I can’t help feel more could have been done to help me, before I reached breaking point.”
What do students think needs to be done? Education needs to start early. An anonymous student said: “People need to know what signs to look for in their friends. They need to understand that depression, anxiety, eating disorders, OCD and bipolar are illnesses, not character flaws.
"The support and education about them need to be on par with the education we get about other medical issues. If we learn about it in school, we will be more prepared when we get to university."
At this year’s National Union of Students (NUS) conference, a motion will be discussed that urges student unions to move “away from awareness, towards action”. It calls for training for staff, integrating mental health into the widening participation agenda, better advertising for support services, and an ensurance that academic policies do not cause additional mental distress to students who experience mental health issues.
Now is the time for action. But the response to our call to share stories shows that there are still many young people who want to talk.
What you said
"I thought everything was my fault and I was just defective and bad and that this was what I deserved from life. I missed out on social life and extra-curricular activities because I struggled with acute feelings of social anxiety, self-hatred and fear. Now I have access to support, I can support others, too, and that’s the best feeling I could ask for."
"I hope my words might help some of you to see that you really aren’t the only one. In my opinion, searching out for help in whatever small way you can manage, really is the best thing."
"Mental health issues are nothing to be ashamed of and affect almost everybody and it’s about time everyone realised this and stopped skirting round the subject and faced it head-on. "
"One thing I’ve found is that so many more people than you realise suffer from mental illnesses. As I’ve talked to friends, more and more of them have been telling me that they too suffer from the same things I do, or they have in the past."
"No matter how bad it gets and how much you think there is no hope and let your depression take over, you can always dig yourself out of that hole and find a way to manage your depression and you are not alone."
"Get help, be heard, let yourself be supported. You’re important."
Read the rest of the contributions to the GuardianWitness assignment here.


For more mental health news, Click Here to access the Serious Mental Illness Blog

smiliu:

You are not alone: student stories of mental health
By Libby Page and Guardian readers, The Guardian

Students share their experiences of mental health issues and reveal a common and worrying problem

When I asked students to share their experiences of mental health at university, I had no idea of the reaction it would receive. Over five days we received over 200 stories. Many entries we weren’t able to include, for legal reasons or because the experiences described were too harrowing to publish.

Originally planned to stay open for two weeks, we decided to close the project early because there wasn’t the capacity to moderate the influx of entries. Each morning we were met with more stories – from students who opened up about their anxieties and struggles.

If you are reading this and are dealing with a mental health issue yourself – you are not alone.

Students shared stories of depression, anxiety, self-harm and suicidal thoughts. Some spoke of diagnosed conditions such as obsessive compulsive disorder and bipolar disorder, and the distructive effect these conditions sometimes have on their education.

When it came to lesser-known issues such as borderline personality disorder, students spoke of a lack of understanding about what they were going through.

Others talked about the embarrassment they felt about asking for help. Some were as yet undiagnosed but clearly struggling: “I stay up all night crying” was a common phrase.

No one tells you that university might be difficult, said students. You were sold on stories from your older friends and the glossy prospectus – there are no footnotes about loneliness and disillusionment.

One anonymous student said: “As a fresher you are constantly reminded that this is supposed to be the ‘time of your life’. When it feels like the worst time of your life you feel both a sense of guilt and a pressure to keep these negative thoughts to yourself.”

Another said: “I spent the first few weeks of uni hiding in my dorm room crying my eyes out. I was homesick and wasn’t sure if I wanted to be there at all.”

Mental health issues can start in childhood, and many students spoke about a history of depression or self-harming that they carried to university. But a new life can add pressures.

"My depression and anxiety started some time before I came to university, but leaving home, being in an extremely taxing social environment and being under large academic pressure all took their toll on me," said one student.

Another said: “Getting tubes or being anywhere I didn’t know felt uncertain. I always had a burning, itching, tormenting anxiety bubbling in my chest. At the time, my boyfriend had no comprehension of mental illness and would regularly tell me panic attacks didn’t exist, that I was stupid and that I had no friends.”

Managing your studies alongside a mental health issue can be a daily struggle. “Panic attacks followed by depression meant things rapidly spiralled out of control,” said one student.

"I found I simply couldn’t think straight and my short term memory became terrible. The best description I could muster was that it felt as though the entire world had been rotated very slightly and nothing was the same anymore."

Another student said: “I’m absolutely terrified of being in social situations in which I don’t know the people I’m speaking to – seminars are a nightmare. I’ve often missed my contact hours because I’ve been up all night crying and stressing and can’t face going in.

"I don’t feel like I can tell my tutors why I’m missing their classes, because I feel like they won’t believe me as I haven’t been officially diagnosed."

Others said the stress of deadlines and feedback from tutors contributed. One student said: “I had a burn-out from the pressure of juggling nine modules. One of the triggers was some negative feedback I recieved in writing from a lecturer which included the word terrible. It was hard to get family support as they live far away.”

Students expressed a general feeling that university support services were helpful – when they could access them. After suffering from a severe anxiety attack, one student took the step to contact their university counselling service.

They said: “I’d put it off for so long, but finally I defined myself as ‘mentally ill’. It did take a few weeks for them to back to me, but nothing can describe the relief I felt when a therapist for the first time said to me, ‘that must be really hard’. Yeah, it was hard! Finally, someone who understood, who didn’t tell me to snap out of it.”

But others are still struggling. “When I started my undergraduate degree I did the responsible thing and informed my supervisor that I had depression,” said one anonymous student, who has since been diagnosed with bipolar disorder.

"He informed me that in his opinion depression was a girls issue and he didn’t know what to do with girls issues and sent me on my way."

Another student said: “My university supported me in my decision to suspend my studies and have helped me get back on track to resume my studies in September, yet I can’t help feel more could have been done to help me, before I reached breaking point.”

What do students think needs to be done? Education needs to start early. An anonymous student said: “People need to know what signs to look for in their friends. They need to understand that depression, anxiety, eating disorders, OCD and bipolar are illnesses, not character flaws.

"The support and education about them need to be on par with the education we get about other medical issues. If we learn about it in school, we will be more prepared when we get to university."

At this year’s National Union of Students (NUS) conference, a motion will be discussed that urges student unions to move “away from awareness, towards action”. It calls for training for staff, integrating mental health into the widening participation agenda, better advertising for support services, and an ensurance that academic policies do not cause additional mental distress to students who experience mental health issues.

Now is the time for action. But the response to our call to share stories shows that there are still many young people who want to talk.

What you said

"I thought everything was my fault and I was just defective and bad and that this was what I deserved from life. I missed out on social life and extra-curricular activities because I struggled with acute feelings of social anxiety, self-hatred and fear. Now I have access to support, I can support others, too, and that’s the best feeling I could ask for."

"I hope my words might help some of you to see that you really aren’t the only one. In my opinion, searching out for help in whatever small way you can manage, really is the best thing."

"Mental health issues are nothing to be ashamed of and affect almost everybody and it’s about time everyone realised this and stopped skirting round the subject and faced it head-on. "

"One thing I’ve found is that so many more people than you realise suffer from mental illnesses. As I’ve talked to friends, more and more of them have been telling me that they too suffer from the same things I do, or they have in the past."

"No matter how bad it gets and how much you think there is no hope and let your depression take over, you can always dig yourself out of that hole and find a way to manage your depression and you are not alone."

"Get help, be heard, let yourself be supported. You’re important."

Read the rest of the contributions to the GuardianWitness assignment here.





For more mental health news, Click Here to access the Serious Mental Illness Blog

findingmyrecovery:

  • It is okay to be freaked out. It is justified to be upset. I know people like to say “oh, everyone gets depressed” and things like that. Guess what, everyone dies, but we still make a big deal out of that
  • Everyone is confused in the beginning. You aren’t stupid or a mess for being lost

My first foray into connecting tumblr with my blog on mental illness and my own personal experiences with it. The above post details the need to not only take care of oneself through medication and therapy, but also through nutrition, exercise, and adequate sleep—the things we may not always think of as related to our mental health, but which can make a great difference with them. 

healinghope:

I absolutely have no tolerance for people who criticize mental illness. Everyone’s situation is valid. You have every right to honor your emotions. If you or someone you know struggles with mental illness, please understand that it’s just as valid as someone who suffers from any other physical ailment.

The problem is the “invisible” nature of mental illness. You can’t see it like you can the more physical ones, and because of that, it’s easy to believe that mental illness isn’t actually there, that it’s instead some choice of the person to be in that suffering condition. People with broken legs aren’t told “you’re just being a big baby, just walk it off”. They can clearly see the leg, and clearly see it’s not right. They can’t do the same with a mental illness.